Job Vacancy: Marketing Specialist

Join the Binyoh Team as a Temporary Marketing Specialist ! Are you a passionate and dynamic individual with a flair for engaging with people? Do you want to be a part of a groundbreaking femtech startup that's empowering African women in their sexual and reproductive health journey? Look no further! Job Title: Temporary Marketing Activation Specialist Duration: 1-week contract Location: Abuja, Nigeria About Binyoh: Binyoh Inc. is a leading female health technology (femtech) startup dedicated to providing tailored sexual and reproductive health content to African women. Our innovative app offers a safe space for women to connect, learn, and access professional advice on their intimate health needs. Job Description: As a Temporary Marketing Activation Specialist at Binyoh, you will play a pivotal role in spreading the word about our app and onboarding new female users. You will be the face of Binyoh during physical activations, connecting directly with potential users and guiding t

Cervical cancer: Myths and Facts in Africa


  • Myth: Cervical cancer is not a serious disease and can be cured by traditional methods.

Fact: Cervical cancer is a serious disease that can be fatal if not detected and treated early. Traditional methods may not be effective in treating cervical cancer, and it is important to seek medical treatment from a qualified healthcare professional.

  • Myth: Cervical cancer is caused by promiscuity or moral failure.

Fact: Cervical cancer is caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and can be prevented through vaccination and regular screening. It is not caused by promiscuity or moral failure.

  • Myth: Cervical cancer is a punishment for immoral behavior.

Fact: Cervical cancer is not a punishment for immoral behavior. It is a medical condition that can be caused by a virus, and can be prevented through vaccination and regular screening.

  • Myth: Cervical cancer is not a major health concern and does not affect many African women.

Fact: Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Africa, particularly among women in low- and middle-income countries. It is important to be aware of the risks and to seek regular screening and treatment options.

  • Myth: Women do not need to be concerned about cervical cancer as they are not at risk.

Fact: All women are at risk of cervical cancer, regardless of age or sexual history. It is important for all women to seek regular screening and vaccination to prevent cervical cancer.

  • Myth: Cervical cancer only affects young women.

Fact: Cervical cancer can affect women of all ages. It is important for women of all ages to seek regular screening and vaccination to prevent cervical cancer.

  • Myth: Cervical cancer is rare in Africa.

Fact: Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Africa, particularly among women in low- and middle-income countries. It is important to be aware of the risks and to seek regular screening and treatment options.

  • Myth: Women who have cervical cancer should be stigmatized and marginalized.

Fact: Cervical cancer is a medical condition that should be treated with compassion and empathy. Stigma and marginalization only add to the burden of the disease and should be avoided.

  • Myth: Vaccination and regular screening are not necessary for preventing cervical cancer.

Fact: Vaccination and regular screening are essential for preventing cervical cancer. They can help detect the disease early, when it is most treatable, and reduce the risk of developing cervical cancer.

  • Myth: There is no proper treatment for cervical cancer in Africa.

Fact: There are various treatment options available for cervical cancer, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. It is important to seek treatment from a qualified healthcare professional, and early detection can increase the chances of successful treatment.

Sources of validation:

  1. World Health Organization. (2020). Cervical cancer. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/health-topics/cervical-cancer/

  2. International Agency for Research on Cancer. (2021). Cervical cancer statistics. Retrieved from https://www.iarc.fr/publications/books/sp147/index.php

  3. World Health Organization. (2020). Cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240003424

  4. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. (2019). Cervical cancer in Africa: A call to action. Retrieved from https://www.figo.org/sites/default/files/2019-09/cervical_cancer_africa_call_to_action.pdf

  5. African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer. (2021). Cervical cancer in Africa. Retrieved from https://www.aortic.org/disease-information/cervical-cancer-in-africa/

  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021). Cervical cancer. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/

  7. National Cancer Institute. (2021). Cervical cancer. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/types/cervical

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